Book review: Not Working by Lisa Owens

Many people spend the majority of their waking time working, so you want a job where you’re happy, and challenged, and where you feel like you’re making a difference. But what if your work just isn’t living up to expectations? (If my boss is reading this, I love my job, we’re not talking about me…

Book review: The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota

Refugee, migrant – two terms that are very politically charged, but how often do we think about the people behind these words? Sunjeev Sahota’s The Year of the Runaways is fiction, but its subject is something that hits the headlines in the real world with alarming regularity, although with little of the nuance displayed in…

Book review: A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

If you go by social media, Hanya Yanagihara’s A Little Life is either the most amazing, emotional, poignant book ever written, or it’s an ill constructed, ridiculous, far too long brick, and there is no in between. Well, I’m here to say that I’m the in between. There are moments of A Little Life I…

Book review: The Last Act of Love by Cathy Rentzenbrink

I very rarely cry at books. I’ll get sad, my heart will hurt, my eyes might tear up, but it takes a lot for those tears to actually spill over. So when I tell you that when I finished the last page of Cathy Rentzenbrink’s The Last Act of Love to realise I had tears…

Book review: In the Unlikely Event by Judy Blume

I don’t think legend is too big a word to use when it comes to Judy Blume. The author is responsible for many of the books teenage girls (and probably some boys) grew up with, from my personal favourites Deenie and Here’s to You, Rachel Robinson, through to Forever, much whispered about in school hallways….

Book review: Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler

Sometimes you pick up a book that is so well written and so beautiful, reading it warms your heart. Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler is definitely one of those books. Henry, Lee, Kip and Ronny grew up together in small-town Wisconsin. They now lead very different lives, but their shared childhood keeps them bonded. The…

Book review: Mrs Hemingway by Naomi Wood

Is talent, a gregarious personality and a way with words enough to make someone who is completely self-obsessed and occasionally violent attractive? I would say no, but Hadley, Fife, Martha and Mary – the four wives of Ernest Hemingway – might have had a slightly different answer. In Mrs Hemingway, Naomi Wood paints a portrait of…

Book review: Hotel Alpha by Mark Watson

Hotels are the ultimate fantasy residence, right? A place where someone else makes your bed and cleans up after you, where you can order food to your door any time of day or night, where you can meet people from all over the world without leaving the building, and where catering to your every whim…

Book review: All This Has Nothing to do With Me by Monica Sabolo

If we’ve not been there ourselves, we’ve certainly had a friend be that person – the woman who analyses every word, every action, every glance that their current crush indulges in. But seeing that kind of detail written down on the page, like it is in French author Monica Sabolo’s All This Has Nothing to…