Book review: A Song for Issy Bradley by Carys Bray

There is no word in the English language to describe a parent who has lost their child, no way to signify to someone in just one word that this is a person who is grieving, who is trying to come to terms with an unspeakable loss. How we grieve, how a parent grieves, is at…

Book review: Asking for It by Louise O’Neill

I’ve never actually been the recipient of a real punch to the gut, but how I felt when I finished reading Louise O’Neill’s Asking For It is how I imagine being whacked really hard in the stomach feels – you’re left momentarily breathless, shocked, unable to process for a minute, and then the hurt piles…

Book review: Leave Your Mark by Aliza Licht

Aliza Licht’s Leave Your Mark promises to help give you tips to land your dream job, kill it in your career, and rock social media.  Those are some big claims, and while I don’t think reading this book is going to suddenly set you on the path to awesomeness, I think it’ll fire you up…

Book review: The Last Act of Love by Cathy Rentzenbrink

I very rarely cry at books. I’ll get sad, my heart will hurt, my eyes might tear up, but it takes a lot for those tears to actually spill over. So when I tell you that when I finished the last page of Cathy Rentzenbrink’s The Last Act of Love to realise I had tears…

Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2015 – shortlist reviews

The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction will crown its 2015 winner tomorrow night, and I’ve read all of this year’s six shortlisted books as part of the We Love This Book Club at work. You can see my mini reviews below, see what other people reading the list thought here, and watch a video of…

Book review: The Loney by Andrew Michael Hurley

I don’t usually read horror, because I’m a scaredy-cat, but Andrew Michael Hurley’s The Loney is more than just a horror novel. When the remains of a young child are found on a section of bleak Lancashire coastline, Smith is forced to think back to a pilgrimage he took with his parents, disabled brother Hanny,…

Book review: Remix by Non Pratt

It’s always difficult to follow up a critically acclaimed, pretty much universally loved first novel, but Non Pratt has risen to the challenge with her second book, Remix. Kaz and Ruby are heading off to Remix, a three-day music festival that is sure to be populated by cool bands (including the hot, hot, hot Adam…

Book review: The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

There is such a lot of young adult fiction out there that sometimes it all becomes much of a muchness, and you lose heart. So I was relieved to discover Melinda Salibury’s The Sin Eater’s Daughter, which has a unique concept and which I could not put down once I started reading. Twylla lives a…

To Kill a Mockingbird (Re)Read

In case you’ve been living under a rock somewhere, you’ll have heard the news that a new novel by Harper Lee, author of the bestselling classic To Killa Mockingbird, will be released this summer. Go Set a Watchman catches up with Scout from To Kill a Mockingbird 20 years later, as she returns home to…